Tyendinaga police considering “pro-active policing” against Indigenous cannabis on reserve

Police, Chief say Mohawk pot illegal By Jason Miller, The Intelligencer Tuesday, July 11, 2017  The Mohawk police chief is set to initiate ‘proactive policing’ to address the proliferation of illegal marijuana dispensaries on the Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory. “There is a plan of action, but I’m not looking to put it out at this point,” said chief Ron Maracle about potential police initiatives to crack down on the dispensaries which have been warned about the risk of continuing operation without proper licences. “I still have another meeting with chief and council, on Monday, before I put my plan in action.” No Read More …

Legacy’s Next Level: 7500 square foot HQ opens on “Cannabis Day”

  By Tom Keefer TYENDINAGA MOHAWK TERRITORY – If there was one downside to Legacy 420’s old location, it was the parking lot. That parking lot was small, pitted with giant potholes, and of course, always full. So when owner Tim Barnhart decided to build a new state-of-the-art facility at 346 York Rd., putting in a big parking lot was at the top of his priorities. And yet, on July 1st – Cannabis Day – there was Barnhart, staring out at his filled to capacity 100 car parking lot, and seeing parked cars stretching down both sides of the road Read More …

This new Indigenous group wants to harness the healing powers of weed

By Tom Keefer | Vice.com | March 29, 2017 The National Indigenous Medical Cannabis Association is helping First Nations grow and sell their own. Last weekend, a few dozen people gathered in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory to formally launch a national Indigenous organization to promote and defend the Indigenous relationship to the cannabis plant. Named NIMCA—the National Indigenous Medical Cannabis Association—the association is aiming to have branches in every province in Canada. With Canadian legalization expected to begin on July 1, 2018, NIMCA is expressing concern that Indigenous people not be ignored or excluded by the Liberal’s legal weed regime framework. As Kevin Daniels, national Read More …

The ‘Cannabis Revolution’ and Native and non-Native cooperation

BAY OF QUINTE – Carl is a 7th generation Irish-Canadian farmer and carpenter who lives near the Bay of Quinte, on Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory. He believes that there is a “Cannabis Revolution” currently underway. In this interview he talks about the local cannabis industry, and how the opening up of nearly a dozen cannabis dispensaries in Tyendinaga has affected the local non-native cannabis market. This interview was recorded in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory by Tom Keefer on May 23rd, 2017.

Is Indigenous cannabis an “aboriginal right”?

How an Ontario Court ruling on Indigenous medicine might affect the “Aboriginal right” of Indigenous people growing and selling cannabis. Table of Contents Justice Edward’s groundbreaking ruling on “Aboriginal Right” Are Indigenous Medical Cannabis Dispensaries an “Aboriginal Right” What defines an “Aboriginal Right”? Aboriginal people have no rights that the Canadian system is required to respect Implications for the Indigenous Medical Cannabis Industry Between equal rights, force decides   By Tom Keefer  In 2014, Ontario Court Justice Gethin Edward made a groundbreaking ruling in a case having to do with Aboriginal rights and Indigenous medicine. The case before him concerned Read More …

Not a pipe dream: Aboriginals set sights on selling marijuana

By Christopher Curtis | Montreal Gazette | March 28 With the federal government on the verge of creating a multi-billion dollar legal marijuana industry, Brian Marquis worries aboriginal people will be left high and dry. Marquis, 57, is a patient at the Legacy 420 dispensary on the Tyendinaga Mohawk territory near Kingston, Ont. And after nearly three years of frequenting the business, he says he has seen the financial potential and medical benefits of cannabis. Now he wants to see storefront dispensaries sprout up in reserves across Canada: providing an economic engine that will help lift indigenous people out of poverty and, he says, provide Read More …

Elected Band Council discusses cannabis in Tyendinaga

By Tom Keefer TYENDINAGA – It is no secret that the cannabis industry is booming in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory. There are now eight different medical dispensaries on the territory, and it seems like more are opening every week. On the morning of Monday, February 20th, 2017, the Elected Band Council of Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory received a presentation from local businessman and cannabis proponent Tim Barnhart. Barnhart is the owner of Legacy 420, a store he opened two years ago as the first cannabis dispensary in an Indigenous community in Canada. Armed with a thick brief of reports and studies spread Read More …

Mario and Buzzy Baptiste: rights, responsibilities, and knowing who you are

TYENDINAGA MOHAWK TERRITORY – Mario and Buzzy Baptiste are two Kanienkehaka (Mohawk) men who have long been involved in the cannabis industry. They were both in attendance at the January 28th meeting of the Indigenous Medical Cannabis Association in Tyendinaga where this interview was recorded. Mario Baptiste provides his understanding of the rights and responsibilities of Onkwehon:we people and the distinction between “Indians” and “natives”. Mario cautions people to know who they really are and to act accordingly. Buzzy and his brother are opening up a new medical cannabis dispensary called Peacemaker 420. Buzzy explains a bit of the background to Read More …

Indigenous Medical Cannabis Association holds inaugural meeting

By Tom Keefer Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory – Over 40 people attended the inaugural meeting of the Indigenous Medical Cannabis Association on Saturday, January 28th. Attendees came from a number of different communities including Tyendinaga, Kanehsatake, Kahnawake, Oneida, Alderville, Pikwakanagan, Golden Lake, Toronto, and from as far away as Calgary, Alberta. The meeting began with a workshop on traditional indigenous governance. The workshop focussed on traditional knowledge, clan structure, and traditional indigenous forms of organization and decision-making. After the presentation, those at the meeting introduced themselves and explained their reasons for attending the meeting. In the go around, a number of Read More …