Elected Council at Six Nations supports Canadian enforcement of cannabis laws on reserve

Six Nations will enforce cannabis laws By Michael-Allan Marion, | Brantford Expositor | Wednesday, July 12, 2017 OHSWEKEN – The Six Nations elected council is making clear to residents on the territory that police will enforce current laws concerning the possession and sale of cannabis for non-medicinal purposes until use of the drug is legalized next year. Meantime, council says it is developing its own policy focusing on community well-being in preparation for the potential change by Ottawa. “Today, the possession and sale of cannabis for non-medicinal purposes is still illegal everywhere across the country,” elected Chief Ava Hill and council said Read More …

It’s time to end Vancouver’s wasteful war on weed for good

By Dana Larsen,  Director of Sensible BC, the Medicinal Cannabis Dispensary and Overgrow Canada | Huffington Post | June 2nd, 2017 Media coverage of Vancouver’s 4/20 protest festival is very different from that given to every other event in the city. While stories about festivals like Vaisakhi or the Pride Parade focus on the revenues generated by local businesses and the economic benefits these community events bring, our cannabis event is viciously attacked in the media as some kind of drain on civic resources. In fact, the complete opposite is true. B.C.’s cannabis industry is one of our province’s biggest economic engines. Read More …

The ‘Cannabis Revolution’ and Native and non-Native cooperation

BAY OF QUINTE – Carl is a 7th generation Irish-Canadian farmer and carpenter who lives near the Bay of Quinte, on Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory. He believes that there is a “Cannabis Revolution” currently underway. In this interview he talks about the local cannabis industry, and how the opening up of nearly a dozen cannabis dispensaries in Tyendinaga has affected the local non-native cannabis market. This interview was recorded in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory by Tom Keefer on May 23rd, 2017.

The Liberal Party elite is heavily invested in the medical marijuana Licensed Producers mail-order business

By Potfacts.ca Anne McLellan is engaged by the law firm Bennett Jones LLP, that describes itself as a ‘very entrepreneurial law firm’ that wants to be the ‘go to’ law firm for licensed producers (LPs) of marijuana in Canada. This is what should disqualify McLellan for the appearance of a conflict of interest. But then Justin Trudeau was first introduced to “legalization” by Tweed Marijuana licensed producer cofounder Chuck Rifici, who has gotten rich as a consequence of his investment in his LP, and who has been agitating for all competing dispensaries and cannabis sellers to be arrested and shut down. Rifici is also the chief Read More …

OxyContin creator expands into Canadian pot industry

When Emblem Cannabis Corp was cleared by the federal government to sell medical marijuana in August, the company set out to attract new investors, vowing to “change the face” of the industry. In company materials, Emblem touted the wealth of experience its top executives brought to the fold, particularly in its pharmaceutical division. The man in charge of that business, John H. Stewart, was a veteran of the drug industry, having spent close to 40 years in key roles at one of the world’s biggest pharmaceutical companies. His successes, Emblem said, included launching 11 new products, in particular one blockbuster Read More …

Medical marijuana firms discussed using banned pesticides

Grant Robertson and Mike Hager  |  The Globe and Mail | March 7, 2017 Two years before Canada’s medical-marijuana sector became embroiled in a tainted cannabis scare, the trade organization representing the majority of commercial growers explored using banned pesticides on their products, according to newly obtained documents. Meeting minutes and confidential e-mails sent in 2015 to more than a dozen companies on the subject, show that some industry members supported using prohibited chemicals such as myclobutanil – a pesticide that produces hydrogen cyanide when combusted and can lead to serious health problems. Though the application for approval was never carried out, myclobutanil Read More …

Is Indigenous cannabis an “aboriginal right”?

How an Ontario Court ruling on Indigenous medicine might affect the “Aboriginal right” of Indigenous people growing and selling cannabis. Table of Contents Justice Edward’s groundbreaking ruling on “Aboriginal Right” Are Indigenous Medical Cannabis Dispensaries an “Aboriginal Right” What defines an “Aboriginal Right”? Aboriginal people have no rights that the Canadian system is required to respect Implications for the Indigenous Medical Cannabis Industry Between equal rights, force decides   By Tom Keefer  In 2014, Ontario Court Justice Gethin Edward made a groundbreaking ruling in a case having to do with Aboriginal rights and Indigenous medicine. The case before him concerned Read More …

Legalizing pot: What to watch for in today’s long-awaited bill

By Catherine Cullen, CBC News Apr 13, 2017 Canada is about to do something very few countries in the world have tried: make recreational pot legal. Today, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government will reveal precisely what it thinks legalization should look like, and there are a ton of fascinating and important questions that need to be answered. First, let’s start with what we already know. CBC News has reported that the federal government will set a minimum age of 18 to buy marijuana, but will give provinces and territories the option to set the age higher. Where it will be sold and how much it will cost will also Read More …

The History of Indigenous Cannabis: Natives, Explorers, and Colonists

by Rowan Robinson | pp. 124-129 of The Great Book of Hemp  (1996) The Vikings depended on hemp for their sails and rope, and they probably carried hemp seed with them and planted it when they visited North America about a thousand years ago. Sailors usually carried supplies of seeds with them to provide the necessities of life in case of shipwreck. Cannabis was already in North America in prehistoric times, possibly brought from China by explorers, drifting shipwrecks, and birds migrating across the Bering Strait to the west coast of the continent. Some of the earliest evidence of hemp Read More …